Data, In Your Lane

Managing an effective transportation network is fast-paced and demanding. Future thinking is essential and can be complex. What if the answers were already at your disposal?

The way you do and have done business can provide insight into how your processes can be more efficient and can even alert you to upcoming challenges. We recommend these four steps for getting started.

1. Focus on what’s important to you.
Every business is different, and your organization’s needs bring their own set of unique challenges. Tackling them all at once isn’t realistic, so the first step is deciding which measures you’d like to improve on first.

2. Leverage single sources that provide multiple key data points.
There is such a thing as too much data. In fact, receiving an abundance of information from multiple sources can be overwhelming and hurt than help. It’s easier to manage fewer services with the right data. Focus on one area of data at a time, and get it right.

3. Look to your existing freight data.
The freight audit and payment process is much more than the last step in closing the loop on a transaction. Valuable and useful data is at your fingertips. Freight bills contain pertinent insight into your relationships with shippers. Examining this information will help you better understand your spend across different variables and can inform future decision-making.

4. Be sure sources are vetted and accurate.
It’s important to note that not all freight data is reliable. Without applying proper business rules, audits and data conditioning, you can’t be certain that your sources are accurate.

Wading through too much data isn’t something you have to or should do alone. If you’re not quite ready for the deep dive, consulting might be an appropriate next step. If you are strategic about this approach, it’s worth it in the long run.

For deeper insights into data analysis and other keys to effective freight and fleet management, please visit our website, bankonus.usbpayment.com.

© 2017 U.S. Bank. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. CR-14140398 (07/17)

 

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Cheryl Garcia

Cheryl Garcia, contributor

About the Author

Cheryl Garcia joined U.S. Bank in 2004 as the principal implementation consultant for the Department of Defense Personal Property Program. She now heads an international team of senior leaders that deliver best-in-class payment solutions to the United States’ Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, State, Health and Human Services, Veteran’s Affairs and the United States Postal Service, as well as corporate customers, including many Fortune 500 companies. Her teams oversee all aspects of sales, relationship management, implementation and account management for U.S. Bank Freight Payment and U.S. Bank Voyager Fleet Card customers.

Cheryl has deep roots in the transportation industry. She founded three moving and storage agencies while earning a bachelor’s in business administration at the University of Texas, building the business into a leader in the household goods industry before selling it in 2000. Cheryl holds an MBA from the University of Texas at San Antonio and is a Certified Public Accountant. Formerly a management consultant, Cheryl helped both Fortune 500 and government organizations to improve efficiencies in operations, project management and financial supply chain. She also provided corporate governance as a member of the board for the nation’s largest municipally owned utility, CPS Energy.

Cheryl enjoys large mouth bass fishing with her husband Jorge and their spoiled dogs, Bugsy and Eddie.